Title: FIRST NATIONS ORAL HEALTH SURVEY (FNOHS) 2009-2010 SUMMARY REPORT
Country: Kind:
Author(s): Year:
Publisher: Location:
Description:

This report presents a number of highlights from the report entitled the First Nations

Oral Health Survey 2009-10. For more details please refer to the complete report at

www.fnigc.ca.

The First Nations Information Governance Centre

Background

The Canadian Health Measures Survey (CHMS) Cycle 1 has an oral health component. However, there were four notable populations excluded from the CHMS sampling frame: First Nations living on reserves, the North, Canadian Forces Bases, and those living in institutions.The First Nations Oral Health Survey (FNOHS) will fill the important information gap on the oral health status of First Nations population living on reserves. The FNOHS built on the work and experience of the CHMS, by using the CHMS oral health survey content, both the interview and clinical examination, as the core of the FNOHS survey and, at the same time, it will be tailored to address additional areas of specific interest to the First Nations population and which are not covered in the CHMS. The FNOHS utilized the established infrastructure of the First Nations Regional Health Survey (RHS) to conduct the FNOHS.This survey is relevant and timely as the FNOHS will establish national level data for the First Nations population living on reserves that will be directly comparable to Canadians as established by the CHMS. The First Nations Information Governance Committee and, Health Canada’s Office of the Chief Dental Officer (OCDO), which has allocated funding for this survey, have recognized the importance of collecting this information which will shape public/population health and health promotion initiatives aimed at improving the oral health status of the First Nations population of Canada.First Nations have higher rates of dental decay and oral disease than Canadians in general.This may be related to a diet higher in sugary foods, lack of water fluoridation, and poor access to dental treatment and prevention services, especially in more remote communities.Type II diabetes, which is nearly four times more common among First Nations than Canadians overall, has also been connected to periodontal disease and tooth loss. There have been only a handful of clinic-based oral health surveys among First Nations in the last two decades – all among children and youth.

FNOHS Summary Report Sept 2012

Reference (Biomedical Style):
FIRST NATIONS ORAL HEALTH SURVEY (FNOHS) 2009-2010 SUMMARY REPORT. 2012.