Title: An Oral Health Survey of American Indian and Alaska Native Dental Patients: Findings, Regional Differences and National Comparisons
Country: Kind:
Author(s): , , Year:
Publisher: U. S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Indian Health Service Division of Dental Services Location: Rockville
URL: [link]
Description:

The 1999 Oral Health Survey is a third look by the Indian Health Service (IHS) at the oral health status and treatment needs of American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) dental patients served by the IHS, urban, and tribal dental clinics. The first Oral Health Survey, which the IHS conducted in 1984, found that 80 percent of AI/AN school children had experienced dental decay and only 28 percent of elders had 20 or more teeth. These findings were used to encourage both IHS and tribal dental programs to expand the use of caries prevention services as similar initiatives were undertaken in the U.S. generally.1 By 1991, when the second Oral Health Survey was conducted, the benefits of the dental prevention programs implemented during the 1980s were becoming evident. During the 1980s, there was a decline in caries prevalence among children both nationally2 and among children served by the Indian Health Service. Between 1984 and 1991 the IHS noted a 173 percent increase in the proportion of young dental patients without any tooth decay and an 11 percent increase in the proportion of elderly dental patients with 20 or more teeth. For the 1999 Oral Health Survey, the IHS collected data from 12,881 dental patients ranging from 2 to 96 years. In some cases, the findings point to conditions that are continuing to improve, such as children’s access to preventive dental sealants. But more often, the data reveal stable or even worsening oral health trends for thousands of AI/AN families. We hope that by recognizing and understanding these trends, tribal leaders, the IHS, and other key stakeholders will be able to develop policies and programs that ensure adequate oral health care for all AI/ANs. Please note that the information presented in this report reflects the oral health of AI/AN dental patients and may not be representative of the general AI/AN population.

Reference (Biomedical Style):
Blahut P, Phipps KR, Reifel N. An Oral Health Survey of American Indian and Alaska Native Dental Patients: Findings, Regional Differences and National Comparisons. Rockville: U. S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Indian Health Service Division of Dental Services; 1999.